Combat

As Gangfight is a combat based game, close combat plays a huge part in the flow of the game. This chapter details the finer elements of combat in the Gangfight game, and how combats are resolved.

Melee Combat

Close combat begins when a model falls within another model’s threat range via the result of a Charge! Action, or a Fight! Action. To execute an attack, you must follow the following steps. 

  1. Check to see if the model you are rolling to attack is within your threat range.
  2. If the model you are attacking is within your model’s threat range, then you make an Attack Roll. To make an attack roll, you roll your Attack attribute. You roll as many dice as you have in your Attack attribute, with the Target Number being your opponent’s Defense attribute. If the Defense attribute of your target is higher than 6, you will need to drop dice from your Attack attribute to reduce the Target Number to at least 6. If you are unable to reduce the target number to 6, you can only hit on 6s, though rolls of a natural 6 still count as a Critical Success.
  3. Each die that matches or beats the target number is considered a hit. For each success you score against your opponent. you inflict 1 Wound.
  4. Your opponent then has to attempt to negate the Wounds. To do this, they roll as many dice as they have in their Armour attribute. The target number is your model’s modified Damage attribute. If your modified Damage attribute is higher than 6, your opponent must drop dice from their Armour attribute to reduce the Target Number to at least 6. If you are unable to reduce the target number to 6, you can only hit on 6s, though rolls of a natural 6 still count as a Critical Success.
  5. Each die that matches or beats the target number manages to negate 1 Wound inflicted from the attack.
  6. Apply the remaining damage to your Endurance attribute, and record the amount left. If the amount is 0 or less, your model is now incapacitated and can be replaced with an Incapacitation Token. Note that even if a model does not take damage from the attack, he will still suffer the effects of the attack (such as those from a Power Attack or a Finesse Attack). 

Once this has been done with each model that has an opposing model within their threat range, the Fight! Action has been resolved. You are in combat until a model moves out of that model’s Threat range, or one of the models is incapacitated.

Ranged Combat

Ranged combat begins when a model falls within another model’s Line of Sight and is equipped with a loaded Ranged weapon. To make a ranged attack, a model must have a loaded weapon, and cannot have any models in their Threat range.  

  1. Check to see if the model you are rolling to attack is within your model’s Line of Sight.
  2. If the model you are attacking is within the threat range of the weapon, then you make a Marksmanship Roll. To make a Marksmanship roll, you roll your Marksmanship attribute. You roll as many dice as you have in your Marksmanship attribute, with the Target Number being your opponent’s Defense attribute. If the Defense attribute of your target is higher than 6, you will need to drop dice from your Attack attribute to reduce the Target Number to at least 6. There are some modifiers that will affect how many dice you can roll. If you are unable to reduce the target number to 6, you can only hit on 6s, though rolls of a natural 6 still count as a Critical Success.
  3. If your target is within close combat, you can only roll a maximum of 3 dice to hit with, even if your Marksmanship attribute is higher than 3.
  4. If your target is within Short Range (ie. the weapons range or less), you can add +1 die to your Marksmanship for being within Point Blank Range.
  5. If your target is within Long Range (ie. 6” or more of your weapon’s range) from your model, you must subtract 1 die from your Marksmanship, and you lose an additional die for each additional increment of 6”.
  6. Each die that matches or beats the target number is considered a hit. For each success you score against your opponent. you inflict 1 Wound on your target.
  7. Your opponent then has to attempt to negate the wounds. To do this, they roll as many dice as they have in their Armour attribute. The target number is your model’s Damage attribute. If your modified Damage attribute is higher than 6, your opponent must drop dice from their Armour attribute to reduce the Target Number to at least 6. If you are unable to reduce the target number to 6, you can only hit on 6s, though rolls of a natural 6 still count as a Critical Success.
  8. Each die that matches or beats the target number manages to negate  1 Wound inflicted from the attack.
  9. Apply the remaining damage to your Endurance attribute, and record the amount left. If the amount is 0 or less, your model is now incapacitated and can be replaced with an Incapacitation Token.

Once this action has been resolved, the Shoot! Action has been completed.

Area of Effect Attacks

An Area of Effect attack is a special sort of ranged attack that can be implemented by special weapons, abilities, or magic. To determine how an Area of Effect affects the targets in the zone, you need to nominate a target. This target must be in range of your attack. There are two different types of Area of Effect attacks. 

Direct Area of Effect

A Direct Area of Effect works as a line to that target. The weapon or ability will have a range, beginning with the user of the Area of Effect, and ending with the target. The player must draw a straight line to the target. The width of the line increases for each success the target using the ability scores – thus, if a dragon is breathing fire at a target 8” away and scores 3 successes with the roll to hit, the line is 3” in width. Any model caught under that area is potentially hit by the flames! The targets of the attack must then make and Opposed Initiative Value Test. If they gain more successes in the roll than the target scored on their roll to hit, they manage to dodge the attack completely. For each success they get, it reduces the damage of the attack by 1, if they don’t completely dodge the attack. If they fail, they are hit, and then must attempt to soak the damage using their Armour.

Indirect Area of Effect

An Indirect Area of Effect works as a blast centered on a target. The weapon or the ability will have a range, and the target must be within that range. The player then rolls to hit with their ability or weapon, and for each success scored increases the radius by 1”. Any models with even a portion of their base within this area are potentially hit by the blast. For example, if a grenade is thrown at a target, and the attacker has 3 successes, everyone within 3” of the targeted model is potentially hit. Each model affected by the blast must make an Opposed Initiative Value Test. If they gain more successes in the roll than the target scored on their roll to hit, they manage to dodge the attack completely. For each success they get, it reduces the damage of the attack by 1, if they don’t completely dodge the attack. If they fail, they are hit, and then must attempt to soak the damage using their Armour.

Damage

Damage is the result of successes being scored against a model during an Attack, whether it is a Melee Attack or a Ranged Attack. The more successes you score during an attack, the more Damage you will inflict and the more Wounds will be resolved.

For Example, a Human Veteran is battling an Orc Brave. He strikes the Orc, rolling a 3, 5 and another 5. That’s two successes. Thus, he inflicts 2 Wounds onto the Orc. 

Armour

You use armour to negate wounds. Once you have had Wound inflicted, you use Armour to negate the wounds. Each success you roll against your opponent’s Damage is 1 wound that is inflicted. 

The Orc, having taken 2 wounds makes an Armour check. His Armour attribute is for, so he rolls 4 dice against the Human Veteran’s Damage (DAM) attribute of 4, and scores a 2, 4, 4, and 5 – thus scoring 3 successes – negating both wounds he was caused. 

Wounds

When a model scores a successful hit against a target, that model has scored Wounds against that target. If a Wound is not negated by an armour check, the Wound is applied to the model’s Endurance (EN) attribute. When you have sustained more wounds than your Endurance (EN) attribute, that model has become Incapacitated and is replace with an Incapacitation Token. 

The Orc Brave has scored 4 hits against the Human Veteran he is currently in combat with. The Human Veteran has an Armour attribute of 4, and the Orc Brave is using a Double Handed Weapon, bringing his Damage attribute to 6. THe Human Veteran player drops 2 dice, bringing his Target Number down to 4+, and rolls the dice. The dice come up 4, and 5 – negating two of the Wounds he’s been caused. He applies those wounds to his Endurance (EN) attribute of 4, and marks off that he has sustained 2 wounds. He can sustain another 2 wounds before becoming Incapacitated. 

Incapacitation 

When a model suffers more Wounds than they have Endurance (EN), the model becomes Incapacitated. An Incapacitated model is removed from the table and replaced with an Incapacitation token. While incapacitated, a model cannot generate Action Points (AP), and cannot perform any actions. For all intents and purposes, a model is removed from the game unless a condition is applied where the incapacitated state is removed. 

A model that sustains any damage once they are Incapacitated are immediately removed, as those models are Dead.

Special Attacks

There are two types of special attacks in Gangfight – Power Attack and Finesse Attacks. To execute either of these, typically an Action is involved per model attempting the strike. 

There are some models that execute special attacks as part of their normal attack, such as creatures larger than medium size, or those with the marauder or skirmisher Perk. In these circumstances, the amount of successful dice not only apply the effect of the Power or Finesse Attack, but also deal additional damage as well – as it is more of a normal attack plus a special attack, rather than simply a special attack. 

Power Attacks

When a model executes a Power Attack, they are throwing all of their weight behind the blow, attempting to knock an opponent back and down. A Power Attack inflicts less damage, but has the ability to knock back an opponent and put the attacker at a more strategic position. When a Power Attack is declared, the model attacks as normal – though instead of applying all of the successes to damage, instead that is how many inches the model is knocked back. Once the models reaches that distance, they are knocked down. 

Finesse Attacks

A Finesse Attack is a way for a model to disengage opponents and put some distance between himself and his foes. A Finesse Attack inflicts less damage, but allows for a model to move out an opponent’s threat without the model suffering the effects of a Free-Strike. When a Finesse Attack is declared, the model attacks as normal – though instead of applying all of the successful dice to damage, instead that is how many inches the model may move from his current position. A model that successfully executes a Finesse Attack may not move through another enemy’s Threat Range, though can move in any direction through the model who he executed the successful attack. 

Attacking with Two Weapons

A model can fight with two hand weapons – whether it is two axes, two swords, and axe and a sword, a hammer and a sword, or even two pistols. Either way, when a model is attacking with two weapons, they can add +1 ATT value to their dice pool. Thus a model with an ATT 3 using two swords could roll 4 dice for their pool rather than their standard 3. This is only with hand weapons, and no other weapon can be used in this fashion. A model attacking with two weapons cannot carry a shield, or anything else in their off-hand.

Falling

Taking damage from falling is something that most warriors are something they will have to contend with at some point in their career. If a model falls further than their model’s  height (1” for Small Models, 1.5” for Medium Models, 2” for Large Models, and 3” for Huge Models), that model will suffer 1 Damage 4 Hit for each increment they fall afterwards, rounding up. Thus, if a Large Model falls 6 inches, that model will suffer 3 Damage 4 Hits. 

Free Strikes

A Free Strike occurs when a model moves through the threatened area of an enemy model. A Free Strike is a free action. Models making a Free Strike may not drop dice to lower a Target Number. 

Slam!

Large or Huge models may attempt to Slam! models that are of the same size or larger, and trample those that are smaller. These attacks can have two very different effects depending on what type of model it is executed against. 

This type of attack against a smaller model than the model executing the attack is called a Trample. To execute a Trample Attack, you must declare it as a special Action. This attack allows the model to execute an attack against all smaller models within the threat range of the attacking model. Models that are being affected by the Trample Attack gain +1 to their Defense, as to help them avoid being struck. When this type of attack is being declared, the model that is performing the Trample can drop dice to lower the Target Number needed to strike his foes, but dice must be dropped for each model that is being struck. For example, if a Knight is attempting to trample three Marksmen, and their Defense is 4 (Defense 3, and then +1 for being trampled), and the Knight has an Attack of 4, he must drop 3 dice to bring all of their Defense down to 3. He will only be rolling 1 dice to attack, but he can roll this 1 die against all 3 opponents. Once he has resolved his attacks, he continues to move the rest of his movement, as if he had charged.

If a Trample Attack is unsuccessful against a model, that model may opt to make a Free Strike against the model that attempted the Trample.

If this type of attack is executed against a model that is the same size or larger, it is considered a Slam! Attack. A Slam! Attack is resolved almost exactly like a Power Attack, though the successes apply to damage as well as knocking the opponent back, and then over. If the model still has movement available to him after making the Slam! Attack, he may follow through with the rest of his movement, should he wish to do so.

Making a Slam! Attack is risky, because should the attack miss, the model who was the target of the attack may make a Free Strike against the attacker.

Size is of great importance to how a Slam! Attack works. If the model is the same size as his target, then no modifiers are needed. If the Attacker is smaller than the target of the attack, then the model has a -1 penalty to their Attack value. In addition to this, the model who is being attacked gains a +1 bonus to their Defense. If the target of this attack is smaller than the attacker, treat this attack as a Trample instead. 

Knocked Down

Models that are knocked down are considered Prone. Prone models are always considered to have a Defense Value of 2 (as all rolls of 1 are automatically considered failures). A model that is prone MUST spend an Action Point to stand up before performing any additional actions.

Cover

Models being targeted by ranged attacks can greatly benefit from cover. There are two types of cover – soft cover and hard cover. You can only benefit from cover if you are within 3” of an obstacle that would provide cover to a model. 

Soft Cover

Models behind soft cover are still in danger of having projectiles penetrating whatever they are shielding themselves with. Soft cover includes forests, shrubs, and fences. When you are against soft cover (within 3”), you gain +1 to your Defense attribute, and +1 to your Armour attribute. 

Hard Cover

Models behind hard cover are much safer from projectiles than those hiding behind soft cover. Hard cover includes rock walls, brick walls, large stones, and the corners of walls and such. When a model is against hard cover (within 3”), that model gains +1 to their Defense attribute, and +2 to their Armour attribute.

For a model to be considered in cover, the obstacle or piece of terrain must at least cover ½ of the model’s volume.

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